American Made Scott Fly Rods

For the fall 2015 salmon run I had the pleasure of using a Scott 8# fly rod. I had high hopes, but questioned whether the rod would perform significantly beyond my other fly rods. The day before the trip I put together the 4 piece Scott, and my current 8# for comparison. The Scott felt better, I thought, but I could only notice a marginal difference if that. The real test would have to be at the river. So I drove north to one of my favorite UP rivers. I woke from my tent to the sounds of eagles. You know what they say about the early bird, the eagles beat me. The rapids were calling. 

Scott Fly Rod

A quick stop at the bank to tie a salmon egg pattern - and then finally the river. It didn't take long to find fish - and hook them. And it took even less time to know I was holding a fine piece of equipment. The fly landed exactly where I wanted it to... most of the time. When it didn't - it was definitely my fault and not the Scott rod. The control, precision, power and feel were beyond what I had experienced with other fly rods (I fish with Sage, Temple Fork, Redington and Orvis).

If I didn't land the fish I couldn't blame it on the rod. Strikes were definitively set before I even knew I did it. The Scott became an extension of my arm and attached to my brain.


The rod worked with me. Maybe it was just meant to be. I bought a Bowtech Carbon Icon earlier this year on the spot. I sampled nearly 10 other bows, some were considerably more expensive than my Carbon Icon - but none of them worked as well - for me. Other people would have a different experience. The same could be for fly rods. Depending on your personal style, casting rhythm, fishing technique - the attributes of one rod or another might fit with one person but not as much for another.

That I don't know. But one thing is certain - this Scott rod performed better in my hands than anything else I've ever fished. I can guarantee this - there will be a Scott 6# and 8# rod in my gear arsenal before the next fishing season.